Thursday, March 31, 2011

Dotty Pottery

A great grouping from Gustavsberg, Sweden, late 50's/early 60's. Stoneware with a whimsical design motif by Britt-Louise Sundell.

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Box Deluxe

Did you know that the Japanese often employed an even purer alloy of Silver than Sterling? A beautiful example is found in the intricate hardware on the Art Deco Rosewood box above.
Box measures just 4" across and 1.5" high

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

A Pair of Pachyderms

50s Elephants from Michael Andersen & Son, created midcentury in Bornholm, Denmark 

Monday, March 28, 2011

Our Latest Hang-ups

Ceramic plaques with an entire home's worth of modernist scenery, courtesy of 50s Italy.

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Opalescent and Magnificent

The unmistakable fluted lines of Barbini, 1950s. 

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Kaleidoscopic Carving

People are always looking for unusual gifts and this item is infinite in it's appeal...quite literally. A hand-carved Rosewood Kaleidoscope; a one-of-a-kind visual toy likely from from the hippy-trippy 60s.

By the way...Yes, I shot the above image through the Kaleidoscope!

Friday, March 25, 2011

Tray Chic

The Italians were wonderful with more than just glass...this lucite piece is pure glamour. Gold plated, eight sided, tortoise-shelled, and the perfect tray for serving fancy cocktails.
measures approximately 12" square

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

3 of a Kind

Modernist salt cellars, these little 3" silver and enamel bowls are from Denmark by a company called MEKA.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Good Gunnar

Known mostly for his work with Rörstrand in Sweden, Gunnar Nylund returned to Denmark in 1959 to assume a short term position as art director at Nymölle pottery. This is an example of his atypical work made during this period with its Escheresque graphic pattern. The glaze has the most subtle glittery quality. A great but small work of art at 7" tall.

Monday, March 21, 2011

More Bright Ideas

Dots and dashes decorate this tall cylindrical vase, a covered box and matching bowl in shades of mustard, lime green and chartreuse. A great set... together again. Made in Italy, 1950s

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Gilt-y Pleasures

The condition of this 50s Italian ceramic is so "pitcher perfect" that the golden glaze seems like the real ore. Illuminated further atop a mid-century Japanese gold leafed wooden tray.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Here Comes The Sun

Tomorrow, March 20th, at around 7pm marks the official start of spring—the vernal equinox—where day and night are each approximately 12 hours long. In celebration, I give you a sunny display of monumental pieces of decorative glass, mostly Blenko

Friday, March 18, 2011

More Silver Stunners

One of America's best known and lauded metalsmiths is John Prip. He was born in the US of Danish descent. His grandfather was also a silversmith at a factory he owned in Denmark, where as a young man John picked up his love for the craft. Above is the famous coffee set often mistakenly attributed solely to Gio Ponti, however we know Ponti did design the flatware that would have been used with what is called the "Diamond"collection. Its origins are most likely a result of two genius minds in collaboration to create this sterling silver service in 1958 for Reed & Barton.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Silver Stunner

A lovely oval silver plated box made in England for American interior designer William A. French & Co 7" across and 3" high

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

Caged Heat 2

Two handsome Italians in a fluted pattern. Not molded per se, but hand blown into a wire cage, a technique I've recently warmed up to.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Swedish Simplicity

2 signed by Stig Lindberg for Gustavsberg, Sweden
7.5" 1978 & 5" 1979

Monday, March 14, 2011

Danish Decoration

A cross-section of our great collection of works by Nils Thorsson for Royal Copenhagen, 1960s. The pattern is called "Baca".

Sunday, March 13, 2011

One Honey of a Bottle

A stand out among ambers is this Blenko stoppered bottle,West Virgina, USA 1968

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Tangerine Dream

An elaborate array of craftsmanship went into this ultimate compote "Made in Italy" likely Bitossi. Gilded, Multi-colored Glaze, Sgraffito, 6.5" high and an impressive 12" wide, this is one fruitful bowl!

Friday, March 11, 2011

Typical, Yet Unique

This Barbini bowl is an oxymoron in glass, as its shape is so recognizable that it's practically signature to the company, yet what makes it special is this cool minty green/caramel/gold color combination rarely seen. I'm sure this particular bowl was made in limited quantities, since in all our years of collecting we have seen very few if any in this particular coloration.

Thursday, March 10, 2011

You've Got Me Twisted

An unsigned vintage abstract sculpture in the manner of Livio Seguso features clear, black and turquoise with a touch of white latticino mixed together with dizzying effect. The fluidity and gravity-defying makes this piece feel like kinetic motion captured in time. 15" tall and infinite in visual interest.

Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Glass Casket

Made mid-century by Mandruzzato, this heavy clear glass box owes homage to the works of Flavio Poli with its Garnet and Amber layered sommerso.
It also features doré (gold plated bronze) details. Sometimes referred to as a casket, but more a more elegant term would be jewelry box.

Tuesday, March 8, 2011

But The Raven Still Beguiling...

Raven Bookend, 1927
Rookwood Pottery of Cincinatti, Ohio has used the raven as part of its identity since its inception in 1880, perhaps influenced by a poem you may have read from the same era. Will we ever know the true connection of these two American classics? Nevermore.

Monday, March 7, 2011

Another Murano Mystery

...or perhaps Empoli?
One thing is clear. The Alrose label is not a factory as much as an importer (likely British or an American attempt at Anglophilia) of Italian glass for the mid-century masses. This is a fantastic example of their swirly signature look. Over 2 feet tall with a bulbous stopper which inversely mimics the bottle shape.

Sunday, March 6, 2011

Lacey Mystery

I'm going to have to throw a wide fishnet here to discover the origins of this lovely Murano bowl. The latticino reminds me of the work of Fratelli Toso, but without any other identifiers I would not be able to attribute with certainty. Any knowledgeable readers care to weigh in on whom to credit with the making of this spectacular piece?
Measures 10.5" across and about 3.5 high.

Saturday, March 5, 2011

Bowled Over

A respected name among late 20th century glass artists is that of Renato Anatra, who established a label called Arte '80, one of a handful of factories to be honored with the endorsement of the Vetri Murano label. This signed luminescent bowl (5.5" in diameter) captures the light like few pieces we have seen.

Friday, March 4, 2011

Deco-Rate

A Swedish bronze by Sune Bäckström, c. 1930s 
Anyone who has been in the shop can attest that we are stocked floor to ceiling with goods, but it was the genius minimalism of design that somehow allowed this bronze to escape my attention for months. Now I can say without reservation that this one is among my favorite forms of decorative art I have ever seen. It captures that stripped down simplicity that defined the deco era, making it vintage and futuristic all at once.

Thursday, March 3, 2011

Srtipe-y Bitossi

All three vases were designed in 1955 by Aldo Londi for Bitossi, he named this pattern "Finestre" Italian for window.

Wednesday, March 2, 2011

Group Think

As often as I focus on individual items for your appreciation, we are firm believers is groupings. This particular trio is an earthy combination of luster and texture from Denmark, c. 1950s. The back two are by Soholm, while the similar style piece in the foreground is from a company called Hyllested Keramik.

Tuesday, March 1, 2011

Grape Soda Glass

Another stunner from Swedish American Carl Erikson. This vintage vase has an extraordinarily wide foot, which at 6" in diameter is about half as wide as the piece is tall. This gives this purple pleaser the kind of stability one would look for when creating substantial floral arrangements.